Archive - March, 2015

Is Morality about Interference or Direction?

C.S. Lewis:

“There is a story about a schoolboy who was asked what he thought God was like. He replied that, as far as he could make out, God was ‘the sort of person who is always snooping around to see if anyone is enjoying himself and then trying to stop it’. And I am afraid that is the sort of idea that the word Morality raises in a good many people’s minds: something that interferes, something that stops you having a good time. In reality, moral rules are directions for running the human machine.”

From Mere Christianity

Continue Reading…

Designing the New American University

This new book from Michael M. Crow and William B. Dabars looks fascinating. Crow has served as the president of Arizona State University (ASU) since 2002. He was formerly executive vice provost at Columbia University and a professor of science and technology policy (a field I almost pursued after completing my bachelor’s degree). Dabars is a senior research fellow in the Office of the President and a research professor in the School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies at ASU.

Crow is widely regarded as one of the pioneering leaders in higher education. He speaks at workshops across the country on topics ranging from education reform, college access, and college affordability. Here’s the book’s trailer: Continue Reading…

Who Do Young Adults Live With?

Are young adults really moving back home at record rates? When they do move back home, what drives that decision? This interesting WSJ article argues that it’s less about the economy and more about student debt. A few highlights:

“The proportion of young adults aged 18 to 31 living with parents has hit 36% from 31% in 2005, and indebtedness—especially rising student debt—explains roughly 30% of this increase.”

Continue Reading…

Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be

Where you go is not who you will be

Frank Bruni’s new book, Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be: An Antidote to the College Admissions Mania looks great, especially for upper and upper-middle class parents currently biting their nails over whether Junior will get into Princeton. For the rest of you, let me explain: Over the next few weeks, tens of thousands of “fat envelopes” (acceptances) and hundreds of thousands of “thin envelopes” (rejections) will be mailed all across the country to high school seniors hoping to get into a couple dozen of the most elite universities. The belief is that if you get into one of these schools, you’re set. After four years of hobnobbing, partying, and anxiety-driven studying, you can count on a cushy job and a clear path to a corner office. While relatively few Americans live out the extreme forms of “college admissions mania,” many more have bought into some form of this pervasive mythology. The truth? How successful a person becomes, financially and otherwise, depends far more on the person than his or her alma mater.

Continue Reading…