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All Knowledge Starts Somewhere in Faith

In the pages of The Chronicle of Higher Education (the trade journal for college professors and administrators), Dr. Peter Conn, professor of English and Education at the University of Pennsylvania, recently penned a provocative essay entitled “The Great Accreditation Farce” (subscription may be required). Conn argued  that religious colleges “undermine the most fundamental purposes of higher education.”

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‘Non-Traditional’ Students Are Majority on College Campuses

Read the breakdown (reported in July 2013, the data appears to be 2011-2012).

Underemployment & College Major. Correlation?

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Are Large Amounts of Student Debt Common?

Whether student debt loads are contributing to the decline in home ownership or not, the personal horror stories making headlines are not normative. That isn’t to say that lots of people don’t have loads of student loads. But on a percentage based, it’s a minority: In 2012, less than 10 percent of students completing a bachelor’s degree had more than $49,000 in debt. Only 0.3 percent of undergraduates had six figures of debt.  The median debt at graduation for a bachelor’s degree was just under $17,000.  (The average figure in 2012 has been reported by another source as being just north of  $29,000.)

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Are Student Loans Holding Back Home Ownership?

A good article in the WSJ explores the question:

Smaller Share of College Students Are Working Their Way Through School

This does not bode well. Since 1979, “taking inflation into account college costs for both private and public institutions have more than doubled, while median hourly wages for young people have fallen by 18%.”

Read  the whole thing.

Related: The Myth of Working Your Way Through College

Big Sale on Preparing Your Teens for College

Available on Amazon’s Kindle, or other e-readers.


















Or learn more about the book.

New Documentary Asks Is College Worth It? Why is it So Expensive?

This documentary hits theaters this month:

Why Aren’t College Graduates Ready for the Workforce?

Bentley University’s PreparedU Project:

  • Fifty-nine percent of business decision-makers and 54 percent of corporate recruiters give recent graduates a grade of C or lower for preparedness in their first job.

Why? There’s a disconnect between business decision-makers and corporate recruiters in what it  means to be prepared.

  • Students define preparedness as “being prepared in general.”  Business decision-makers and corporate recruiters define preparedness more specifically: work ethic, adaptability, a good attitude, respectfulness and maturity.
  • Six in ten business leaders give recent grads a C or lower on their soft skills. Only 22 percent of recent grads would agree.
  • Business leaders rank integrity, professionalism and positive attitude as the most important soft skills while students rank those significantly lower.
  • A slight majority (52 percent) of recent graduates  identify a college degree as a virtual guarantee of success. Only 28 percent of business decision makers agree.

Read the whole thing.

Under 40? Got Student Debt? Good Chance You’re Poor

About 4 in 10 U.S. households headed by someone under the age of 40 have student debt, the highest level ever, according to a study. The median debt level is about $13,000.Walter Hamilton writing for the LA Times:

College graduate heads-of-household under 40 with student debt have a median net worth of only $8,700, according to the analysis by the Pew Research Center. That’s a fraction of the $64,700 the same group without college loans is worth.

They’re not  all drowning in student debt–the median student debt for this group is about $13,000–it’s that “because of the other loans they’ve taken out, the median total indebtedness of college graduates under 40 with student loans is $137,010…compared to $73,250 for their counterparts with no college debt.”

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